DP History course outline

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History is always contemporary!” - Benedetto Croce
 
I INTRODUCTION
 
Welcome to IB two-year History course!
 
II ACADEMIC / CURRICULUM GOALS
 
As described by the IB Group 3 History subject guide,
 
AIMS:
 
The aims of the Diploma Program history course, at both standard and the higher level are to:
  1. Develop an understanding of, and continuing interest in the past;
  2. Encourage students to engage with multiple perspectives and to appreciate the complex nature of historical concepts, issues, events and developments;
  3. Promote international-mindedness through the study of history from more than one region of the world;
  4. Develop an understanding of history as a discipline and to develop historical consciousness including a sense of chronology and context, and an understanding of different historical perspectives;
  5. Develop key historical skills, including engaging effectively with sources;
  6. Increase students’ understanding of themselves and of contemporary society by encouraging reflection on the past.
     
OBJECTIVES:
 
Assessment objective 1: Knowing and understanding
  • Demonstrate detailed, relevant and accurate historical knowledge;
  • Demonstrate understanding of historical concepts and context.
  • Demonstrate understanding of historical sources (internal assessment and paper 1).
Assessment objectives 2: Application and analysis
  • Formulate clear and coherent arguments;
  • Use relevant historical knowledge to effectively support analysis;
  • Analyze and interpret a variety of sources (internal assessment and paper 1).
Assessment objective 3: Synthesis and evaluation
  • Integrate evidence and analysis to produce a coherent response;
  • Evaluate different perspectives on historical issues and events, and integrate this evaluation effectively into a response;
  • Evaluate sources as historical evidence, recognizing their value and limitations (internal assessment and paper 1)
  • Synthesize information from a selection of relevant sources (internal assessment and paper 1).
Assessment objective 4: Use and application of appropriate skills
  • Structure and develop focused essays that respond effectively to the demands of a question;
  • Reflect on the methods used by, and challenges facing, the historian (internal assessment);
  • Formulate an appropriate, focused question to guide a historical inquiry (internal assessment);
  • Demonstrate evidence of research skills, organization, referencing and selection of appropriate sources (internal assessment).
III COURSE DESCRIPTION AND CONTENT
 
As the IB Subject Guide (2015) states:
 
DP history course is a world history course based on a comparative and multi-perspective approach to history. It involves the study of a variety of types of history, including political, economic, social and cultural, and provides a balance of structure and flexibility. 
 
The study of history from an international perspective is increasingly important today. Our understanding of present times mostly depends on our understanding of the past
 
SYLLABUS DETAIL:
 
YEAR 1 (Grade 11)
 
Prescribed subject 3: The move to global war
 
  1. Case study 1: Japanese expansion in East Asia (1931 - 1941)
    • Causes of expansion: (the impact of Japanese nationalism and militarism on foreign policy; Japanese domestic issues and their impact on foreign relations; political instability in China)
    • Events: (Japanese invasion of Manchuria and northern China (1931); Sino-Japanese War (1937-1941); The Three Power / Tripartite Pact; the outbreak of war, Pearl Harbor (1941)
    • Responses: (League of Nations and the Lytton report; political developments within China – the Second United Front; international response, including US initiatives and increasing tensions between the US and Japan)
  2. Case study 2: German and Italian expansion (1933 – 1940)
    • Causes of expansion: (impact of Fascism and Nazism on the foreign policies of Italy and Germany; impact of domestic issues on the foreign policies of Italy and Germany; changing diplomatic alignments in Europe; the end of collective security; appeasement)
    • Events: (German challenges to the post-war settlements (1933-1938); Italian expansion: Abyssinia (1935-1936); Albania, entry into the WWII; German expansion (1938-1939); Pact of Steel, Nazi-Soviet Pact and the outbreak of WWII)
    • Responses: (International response to German aggression 91933-1938); International response to Italian aggression (1935-1936); International response to German and Italian aggression (1940)
World history topics:
  1. Causes and effects of 20th century wars
    • Long term and Short term causes of war / economic, ideological, political, territorial causes and different interpretations – WWI, WWII,
    • Spanish Civil War; Russian Civil War)
    • Types of war: civil wars, wars between states, guerilla, revolutionary and total wars;
    • Technological developments in weaponry, changes in warfare (air, land and sea)
    • The extent of the mobilization of human and economic resources;
    • The influence and/or involvement of foreign powers
    • The successes and failures of peacemaking;
    • Territorial changes;
    • Political repercussions;
    • Economics, social and demographic impact; changes in the role and status of women
  2. Authoritarian states (20th century)
    • Emergence of authoritarian states (China and Mao, Germany and Hitler, USSR and Lenin and Stalin, Spain and Franco, Italy and Mussolini)
    • Consolidation and maintenance of power (use of legal methods, use of force, charismatic leadership, propaganda; nature, extent and treatment of opposition; the impact of foreign policy on the maintenance of power)
    • Aims and results of policies (aims and impact of domestic economic, political, cultural and social policies; the impact on minorities and women; authoritarian control)
  3. The Cold War: Superpower tensions and rivalries (20th century)
    • Rivalry, mistrust and accord
    • Leaders and nations (Truman, Stalin, Brandt, Khrushchev)
    • Propaganda and state control
YEAR 2 (Grade 12)
 
19th and 20th century Europe 
 
The French Revolution and Napoleon (1774 – 1815)
  • Crisis of the Ancien Regime; Intellectual, political, social, financial and economic challenges;
  • Role of the monarchy, Louis XVI, Monarchy to Republic;
  • Social, economic, political problems;
  • Constitution; Radicalism, Terror;
  • Revolutionary wars (1792-1799), rise of Napoleon I;
  • Rise and rule of Napoleon and his domestic and foreign policies;
  • Napoleonic wars (1803-1815), defeat and collapse of the Empire;
  • Congress of Vienna, its settlement and Metternich’s influence in Europe.
Germany (1815 – 1890) 
  • Unification of Germany 
The Tsarist Russia, revolution and the establishment of the Soviet Union, including Stalin and the struggle for power (1855 -1929)
  • Alexander II, the extent of reform;
  • Causes of the 1905 Revolution and its consequences;
  • The impact of the First World War and the final crisis of autocracy in February/March 1917;
  • 1917 Revolutions - February/March, provisional government and dual power; October/November Bolshevik Revolution, Lenin and Trotsky;
  • Lenin’s Russia, Civil War, War communism, New Economic Policy, terror and coercion, foreign relations.
  • Soviet Union (1924-1929) – Stalin and the struggle for power; defeat of Trotsky; purges and the Great Terror; government and propaganda under Stalin;
  • Five-year plans and collectivization
Versailles to Berlin: Diplomacy in Europe (1919 – 1945)
  • Peace settlements;
  • The League of Nations, successes and failures of the collective security;
  • Appeasement and causes of the Second World War;
  • Impact of the WWII on civilian populations in two countries between the years 1939 - 1945.
Review of the curriculum for the:
  • Mock exams at ISB;
  • Post-mock exams, there will be a review of the two years’ content before the final IB DP May 2017 examinations
IV EXPECTATIONS
 
What to expect from the teacher:
  1. Pace & pattern: Expect to move through the year’s content following the cycle schedule.
  2. In-class work: Expect to use class time efficiently and productively. We will set up working portfolios to accommodate class work which will involve creating TIMELINES, designing CONCEPT MAPS (to visualize your thinking); PRIMARY SOURCE analysis (paper 1), and WRITING persuasive and analytic essays (papers 2 and 3). One day per cycle will be set aside for writing essays which will be filed in the essay writing portfolios.
  3. Reading: Expect to have daily reading assignments. The core textbook will always be supplemented by other readings (various primary and secondary sources & articles & historical books)
What is expected from the student:
  1. Definition, Reflection, Understanding - to be able to define and differentiate the main driving forces of 20th century history.
  2. Autonomous learning: To become or continue being a proactive self-motivated learner.
  3. Writing, writing, and writing: To be able to articulate in writing a well-substantiated and reasoned argument in response to broadly framed essay questions. Writing will be the basis of student assessment: “How can I know what I think, until I see what I say?” (J. Conrad)
V DP History ASSESSMENT Terminology
 
The following 3 types of assessment will be prepared for and completed over the two years. They will be assessed externally:
Written Papers – total of 5 hours
  1. Paper 1: Document-based assessment, which will involve reading a selection of historical sources, both primary and secondary, and answering four questions on prescribed subject 1 in one hour. Prescribed subject 1, the topic that we will be preparing in relation to Paper 1, is: The Move to Global War;
    Paper 2: Essay-based assessment on 20th century world history topics. In this paper, students are to write 2 essays from a selection of 30 essay questions in 1.5 hours. The essay questions are broad and are divided into six 20th century world history topics. Into three history topics: Authoritarian states; Causes and effects of 20th century wars, The Cold War.
  2. Paper 3 (HL only): Essay-based assessment on one of the regional options (Aspects of the history of Europe). Examination paper 3 comprises of 25 questions, and students need to make a choice and answer three essay questions in 2.5 hours.
  3. Internal Assessment (externally moderated)
    Historical Investigation: 1800 – 2200 words research-based project. The investigation is to focus on a specific historical question, (determined by the student him/herself), that allows them to develop and apply the skills of a historian, like analyzing and evaluating the source material and managing various perspectives, and opposing interpretations. The project will be started in semester 2 of the Diploma year 1, and be finalized at the beginning of year 2. (Steps in the historical investigation process will earn ISB grades, although the final product will only be an IB grade.)
Nuts & Bolts:
  1. Readings – reading assignments must be done before coming to class.
  2. Notebooks – note-taking: Use your notebook (electronic or other format) as a log of your daily activity – keep track of each cycle and what the focus is. There will be periodic notebook checks throughout the year; you’ll need to keep notes of both at-home readings, in-class activities, and informal reflective writing.
  3. Essay writing: the primary skills focus is on writing. Essays you write will constitute your growing essay portfolio. You will choose several and rewrite for improvement. These will weigh more heavily in your overall grade.
  4. Late / make up assignment policy: 10% will be deducted from the grade of any work submitted after the due date. Work submitted substantially late will be given formative feedback only. Work not submitted three days after the due date will be awarded a zero. If a student is absent, the assignment must be turned in on the first day back to receive full credit. The idea behind this is that students are responsible to check with their teacher/peers to make up missed work.
  5. Tardiness: Be on time for class. All tardies or absences will be noted.
  6. Academic honesty: Have in mind that plagiarism will lead to serious consequences. Distinguish between correct paraphrasing, direct quotation, and citation formats. Any notebooks or homework that looks too similar will also face serious penalties. For more information, please see the ISB Assessment and Academic honesty policy document.
  7. Respect: Respect each other’s voice. Listen to each other. Do not cut each other off in class discussions.
VI GRADING
 
Grading policy is aligned with the IB and ISB assessment policy
 
30% Content tests
20% Conversation exercice and constructive participation
20% In-class essay portfolio
30% Take-home rewrites & document based assessment/essays; 
        Historical Investigation
 
Year 1:
 
Final grades in Semesters 1 and 2 during the Year 1 will be scored:
40% quarter 
40% quarter 
20% semester exam
 
Year 2: 
 
Final grade in Semester 1 will be scored:
40% quarter
40% quarter
20% semester exam
 
Final grade in Semester 2 will be scored:
80% Quarter 3
20% overall mock grade         
 
VII CONTACT
 
Feel free to contact me via e-mail bsreckovic@isb.rs or by calling the school.

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