THE ARTS IN A TRANSDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMME
 
The arts are integral to the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP) at ISB. They are a powerful mode of communication through which students explore and construct a sense of self and develop an understanding of the world around them. Arts provide students with a wide range of opportunities and means to respond to their experiences and engage with historical, social and cultural perspectives. The students are stimulated to think and to articulate their thoughts in new ways, and through a variety of media and technologies. The PYP recognizes that not all learning can be supported solely through language, and that arts as a medium of inquiry also provide opportunities for learning, communication and expression. Learning about and through arts is fundamental to the development of the whole child, promoting creativity,
critical thinking, problem-solving skills and social interactions.

The Arts at ISB provide a unique vehicle to enhance the understanding of the transdisciplinary themes by providing both students and teachers with a range of mediums with which to access the units of inquiry. Arts support the acquisition of essential knowledge and skills, the development of conceptual understanding, the demonstration of positive attitudes, and the taking of action. We find opportunities to infuse arts teaching and learning in all areas of the curriculum that are relevant to the community of learners and reflect the educational theories underpinning the programme.

In Arts, two common strands have been identified that apply across the different art forms and define the critical artistic processes. These intrinsically connected strands are concept-driven and have been designed to interact with each other, working together to support the overall development of the students.
 
Responding
 
The process of responding provides students with opportunities to respond to their own and other artists’ works and processes, and in so doing develop the skills of critical analysis, interpretation, evaluation, reflection and communication. Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the concepts, methods and elements of dance, drama, music and visual arts, including using specialized language. Students consider their own and other artists’ works in context and from different perspectives in order to construct meaning and inform their own future works and processes.

The responding strand is not simply about reflecting; responding may include creative acts and encompasses presenting, sharing and communicating one’s own understanding. By responding to their own artwork and that of others, students become more mindful of their own artistic development and the role that arts play in the world around them.
 
Creating
 
The process of creating provides students with opportunities to communicate distinctive forms of meaning, develop their technical skills, take creative risks, solve problems and visualize consequences. Students are encouraged to draw on their imagination, experiences and knowledge of materials and processes as starting points for creative exploration. They can make connections between their work and that of other artists to inform their thinking and to provide inspiration. Both independently and collaboratively, students participate in creative processes through which they can communicate ideas and express feelings. The creating strand provides opportunities for students to explore their personal interests, beliefs and values and to engage in a personal artistic journey.
 
MUSIC

Music enables students to communicate in ways that go beyond their oral language abilities. Music delights and stimulates, soothes and comforts us; music allows students to communicate in a unique way. Musical experiences and learning begin with the voice. It is important that students are given opportunities to discover a broad range of music experiences including classifying and analysing sounds, composing, exploring body music, harmonizing, listening, playing instruments, singing, notation, reading music, songwriting and recording. In creating, students use their imagination and musical experiences to organize sounds—natural and technological—into various forms that communicate specific ideas or moods. In responding, students are given the opportunity to respond to different styles of music, as well as to music from different times and cultures. Individually and collaboratively, students have the opportunity to create and respond to music ideas. By exposing students to a wide and varied repertoire of musical styles, they can begin to construct an understanding of their environment, their surroundings and structures, and begin to develop personal connections with them.

Music is a part of everyday life. Listening to and performing music can be a social activity. The development of listening skills, an important aspect of all learning, is constantly reinforced. Teachers are aware that music plays an important part in the language learning process. Through songs and rhymes, students can hear patterns and develop a sense of the rhythm that applies to languages. This can be especially apparent when learning a new language because the meaning of the words is not necessarily understood, and so students concentAs schools may wish to adapt the PYP arts scope and sequence according to their needs, ISB developed their own document, weaving Music and Visual Arts together through a series of units connected to the Programme of Inquiry.
Teachers developed the conceptual understandings into central idea(s) that students can explore, incorporating the developmental continuums of the PYP arts scope and sequence. We also integrated additional outcomes into our PYP arts scope and sequence.rate on the rhythms and patterns they hear. Wherever possible, teachers try to include rhymes and songs in their teaching activities, not just in designated music classes.

Music is both an active and reflective process when making and listening to it. Students can draw on a wide range of sources in their music learning: music composed by themselves and other students; music composed by musicians; literature; paintings; dance; their own imagination; real-life experiences; feelings; values and beliefs. They are exposed to live performances as well as recordings. Additionally, the opportunity to participate in live performances—informal as well as formal—allows students to work collaboratively and gain awareness of the audience.
 
A PYP music classroom provides an environment that stimulates and challenges students. It is well resourced with an extensive range of music recordings, videos and instruments. Students have the opportunity to explore home-made as well as manufactured instruments from a variety of countries and cultures. ICT can influence and enhance learning in music by allowing students to create, compose and record their work as well as listen to, observe and share music through digital and analogue means.
 
VISUAL ARTS

The term “visual arts” is used to describe practices that have been more traditionally described in education as “art, craft and design”. It is important that students are exposed to a broad range of experiences that illustrate the field of visual arts, including architecture, bookmaking, ceramics, collage, costume design, drawing, graphic design, film, illustration, industrial design, installation, jewellery, land art, mask making, metalwork, painting, papermaking, performance art, photography, printmaking, sculpture, set design, textiles and woodwork.

Wherever possible, students have the opportunity to experience visual arts beyond their own initial involvement. This may be achieved by inviting artists into the school, or by visiting art galleries, museums, artists’ and designers’ studios, exhibitions, film sets and/or theatres. Students begin to appreciate the depth and breadth of the field by experiencing visual arts created by diverse artists—locally and globally, now and in the past, by women and men, and by people of different backgrounds.

In visual arts, the role of the sketchbook is integral to this process. The sketchbook provides a space for students to take ownership of their learning, to creatively explore personal interests and to develop their own style. The PYP recognizes the range of forms a sketchbook may take, reaching beyond the physical book to possibly include new media, sound and film. ICT can be used in the visual arts classroom as a tool to enhance the creative experience. Photo and film editing, animation, web design, drawing, computer-aided design, audio and word processing programs can be used as tools to engage students with the conceptual understandings detailed in the continuums.
 
As schools may wish to adapt the PYP arts scope and sequence according to their needs, ISB developed their own document, weaving Music and Visual Arts together through a series of units connected to the Programme of Inquiry.
Teachers developed the conceptual understandings into central idea(s) that students can explore, incorporating the developmental continuums of the PYP arts scope and sequence. We also integrated additional outcomes into our PYP arts scope and sequence.
 
A PYP music classroom provides an environment that stimulates and challenges students. It is well resourced with an extensive range of music recordings, videos and instruments. Students have the opportunity to explore home-made as well as manufactured instruments from a variety
 
Phases  Responding Creating
1 Learners show an understanding that the different forms of arts are forms of expression to be enjoyed. They know that dance, drama, music and visual arts use symbols and representations to convey meaning. They have a concept of being an audience of different art forms and display awareness of sharing art with others. They are able to interpret and respond to different art forms, including their own work and that of others. Learners show an understanding that they can express themselves by creating artworks in dance, drama, music and visual arts. They know that creating in arts can be done on their own or with others. They are aware that inspiration to create in arts comes from their own experiences and imagination. They recognize that they use symbols and representations to convey meaning in their work.
2 Learners show an understanding that ideas, feelings and experiences can be communicated through arts. They recognize that their own art practices and artwork may be different from others. They are beginning to reflect on and learn from their own stages of creating arts. They are aware that artworks may be created with a specific audience in mind. Learners show an understanding that they can use arts to communicate their ideas, feelings and experiences. They use strategies in their work to enhance the meaning conveyed and to make it more enjoyable for others. They are aware that their work can provoke different responses from others. They understand the value of working individually and collaboratively when creating different art forms.
3 Learners show an understanding that issues, beliefs and values can be explored in arts. They demonstrate an understanding that there are similarities and differences between different cultures, places and times. They analyse their own work and identify areas to revise to improve its quality. They use strategies, based on what they know, to interpret arts and understand the role of arts in our world. Learners show that, as artists, they can influence thinking and behaviour through the arts they create. They think critically about their work and recognize that their personal interests, beliefs and values can inform their creative work. They show an understanding of the relationships between their work and that of others.
4 Learners show an understanding that throughout different cultures, places and times, people have innovated and created new modes in arts. They can analyse different art forms and identify common or recurring themes or issues. They recognize that there are many ways to enjoy and interpret arts. They accept feedback from others. Learners show an understanding that their own creative work in dance, drama, music and visual arts can be interpreted and appreciated in different ways. They explore different media and begin to innovate in arts. They consider the feedback from others in improving their work. They recognize that creating in arts provides a sense of accomplishment, not only in the process, but also in providing them with a way to understand the world

We also identified Elements and Principals of Art and Music that are addressed through the Arts Units of Inquiry.

elements of art principles of art elements of music principles of music
Line, shape, color, space, form texture and value Balance, movement, rhythm, pattern, contrast, emphasis and unity tempo dynamics duration intensity pitch timbre composition phrasing genre texture rhythm harmony & form