IB DP Language A: Self –Taught Literature (SL)

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Introduction (From the 2019 Language A: Literature IB Guide):
In Language A: literature courses, students will focus exclusively on literary texts, adopting a variety of approaches to textual criticism. Students explore the nature of literature, the aesthetic function of literary language and textuality, and the relationship between literature and the world.                          .
Students are expected to develop their proficiency, fluency and linguistic range, and in particular to acquire the vocabulary appropriate to the analysis of texts. They will also deepen their understanding of a wide variety of concepts explored through literary texts in order to interpret, analyse, evaluate and then communicate this understanding in clear, organized and developed products.
 
The ISB Language: A Self-Taught Course: 
The School Supported Self-Taught Literature course requires the collaboration of students, parents, tutors, the DP Coordinator, and the supervisor.  School Supported Self-Taught students follow the same program as other Language A students, but the difference is the necessity for a tutor (with teaching experience, preferably with IB experience), and the inherent independent nature of a “self-taught” course. Students are required to meet or check in with the course supervisor every week, and study independently, allotting appropriate time on their own and with their tutor to the reading, researching, and assessments related to the texts. Tutors can assist with the selection of texts, and students will be provided with guidance regarding course expectations and assessments by the Self-Taught Supervisor. Tutors should give feedback on assessments based on the IB criteria, and students will be awarded a grade of PASS or FAIL as determined by the supervisor, taking into account the tutor recommendation as well as the progress/completion of assignments.All final grades for the course, however, will be established through external assessments by IB examiners given in the spring of Grade 12.
 
Studies in language and literature aims (from the IB Guide):
The aims of all subjects in studies in language and literature are to enable students to:
1. Engage with a range of texts, in a variety of media and forms, from different periods, styles, and cultures
2. Develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, presenting and performing
3. Develop skills in interpretation, analysis and evaluation
4. Develop sensitivity to the formal and aesthetic qualities of texts and an appreciation of how they contribute to diverse responses and open up multiple meanings
5. Develop an understanding of relationships between texts and a variety of perspectives, cultural contexts, and local and global issues, and an appreciation of how they contribute to diverse responses and open up multiple meanings
6. Develop an understanding of the relationships between studies in language and literature and other disciplines
7. Communicate and collaborate in a confident and creative way
8. Foster a lifelong interest in and enjoyment of language and literature.
 
Syllabus Detail:  
This is a two-year course, during which you will read 9 Literary works in 3 parts(Areas of Exploration): 
 
Areas of Exploration
1. Readers, Writers, and Texts
Works are chosen from a variety of literary forms. The study of the works could focus on the relationships between literary texts, readers and writers as well as the nature of literature and its study. This study includes the investigation of the response of readers and the ways in which literary texts generate meaning. The focus is on developing personal and critical responses (close literary analysis).
 
2. Time and Space
Works are chosen to reflect a range of historical and/or cultural perspectives. Their study focuses on the contexts of literary texts and the variety of ways literary texts might both reflect and shape society at large. The focus is on the consideration of personal and cultural perspectives, the development of broader perspectives, and an awareness of the ways in which context is tied to meaning.
 
3. Intertextuality: Connecting Texts
Works chosen provide students with an opportunity to make fruitful comparisons. Their study focuses on intertextual relationships between literary texts with possibilities to explore various topics, thematic concerns, generic conventions, literary forms or literary traditions. The focus is on the development of critical responses grounded in an understanding of the complex relationships among literary texts.
 
Concepts:
Identity, Culture, Creativity, Communication, Perspective, Transformation, Representation.
Concepts are vital in studies in language and literature courses since they help to guide the study
of texts across the three areas of exploration. The concepts create a sense of continuity in the transition from one area to the next and also facilitate the process of establishing connections between texts. There are seven concepts (above) which structure the teaching and learning of Language A courses, which have been selected because of the central position they occupy in the study of language and literature. 
 
Course Texts:
Students, with the assistance of both their tutors and their parents, make selections from the Prescribed Reading List, available online.  It is the responsibility of the students, tutors, and parents to ensure that the selected reading list follow the guidelines set by the IB.  The supervisor and DP Coordinator will assist in this process.  Students are required to obtain these works.
 
SL students must study at least 9 works, of which:
o   Minimum of 4 works originally in your Self-Taught Language
o   Minimum of 3 works TRANSLATED into your Self-Taught Language
o   Remaining works can be either originally in your Self-Taught Language or in Translation into your Self-Taught Language
o   ALL works for Self-Taught students MUST be by authors listed on the Prescribed Reading List
Additionally, the works chosen must meet the following requirements:
o   There must be a minimum of 2 works per part (area of exploration) of the course, listed above
o   Texts have to cover 3 literary forms/genres (Prescribed Reading List includes 4)
o   Texts have to cover 3 periods
o   Texts have to cover 3 countries or regions (as defined on the Prescribed reading list) in at least two continents.
o   You cannot study the same author more than once or an author studied in another IB course
 
*NOTE from IB Guide on literary works: 
A work is defined for studies in language and literature courses as one single major literary text, such as a novel, autobiography or biography; two or more shorter literary texts such as novellas; 5–10 short stories; 5–8 essays; 10–15 letters; or a substantial section or the whole of a long poem (at least 600 lines) or 15–20 shorter poems. Where more than one text is studied as part of a work, texts must be from the same author.    
 
Assessment in Self-Taught Language A: Literature:
 
The new course syllabus does not bind the areas of exploration to particular assessment components; there is room for individual decisions to be made by students about the works for each of their assessment tasks. The freedom to make course design decisions requires careful planning to guarantee that requirements are met throughout the teaching of the syllabus material. However, students cannot use the same literary work for more than one assessment component.
Assessment criteria are used to assess students for all assessment tasks. 
There are four criteria for each of the assessment components:
Criterion A: (Knowledge - for Paper 2 and Oral), Understanding, and interpretation
Criterion B: Analysis and evaluation
Criterion C: Focus and organization
Criterion D: Language
 
The Self-Taught coordinator will provide additional, more specific information on assessment tasks and criteria for each task. Assessment criteria MUST be read and understood by the student and the tutor, so that the student is aware of expectations and the tutor has an understanding of how to assess student work. Students must ensure that they are working toward the objectives of the task and assessment criteria and receive feedback from the tutor on each criterion for each task. This will help the student prepare for their final exams and submissions of tasks to the IB in year 2 (G12).Ultimately, all assessment tasks for school-supported self-taught (SSST) students are externally assessed.     
 
Assessment Components and Weighting:
 
Self-Taught Course Responsibilities:
For success in the ST program at ISB, the following responsibilities must be met by all parties indicated with a "x"
Student
Parent/
Guardian
Tutor
Supervisor
DPCoordinator
Attend ST/ Supervisor meeting once per week/rotation
x
   
x
 
Work independently during unsupervised time every week
x
       
Secure a Tutor (preferably an experienced teacher, esp. IB)
(Must be available via email to communicate with Supervisor and DP Coordinator)
x
      x
     
Provide students/ parents/ guardians and tutors with an overview of the ST course and Prescribed Reading List
     
x
 
Create a reading list of 9 works corresponding to Areas of Exploration from the Prescribed Reading List and according to the guidelines outlined by the IB (see texts section)
(Assisted by Supervisor and DP Coordinator)  
x
 x
x
   
Set learning objectives and create assignments to meet these objectives     (Based on IB required tasks and rubrics)
   
x
x
 
Ensure that students have access to the works chosen 
x
x
     
Assess the student’s ability to communicate effectively both orally and in written form in their ST language; provide feedback on assessment tasks and responses to literature (oral and written)
   
x
   
Read the works chosen and engage in literature analysis with students verbally, or via online platform(s)
x
 
x
   
Ensure that the candidate has access to, and is familiar with the assessment tasks and criteria for all assessed components and meets IB submission deadlines for these tasks
     
x
 x

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