IB DP English

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Introduction: Welcome to IB DP English!

IB DP Language and Literature involves the study of fiction texts of varying genres (6 for HLand 4 for SL), as well as many other texts; it covers not only the classic analysis of literature and “literary” texts, but also examines a wide variety of non-fiction and visual texts from a range of sources. 
 
Students will focus closely on the language of the texts they study, and become aware of the role of each text’s wider context in shaping its meaning. This is an inquiry-based course, and students will be encouraged to question the meaning generated by language and texts, which can be argued, and are rarely straightforward and unambiguous. 
 
Course Aims
 
The aims of all subjects in studies in language and literature are to enable students to:
 
  1. Engage with a range of texts, in a variety of media and forms, from different periods, styles, and cultures
  2. Develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, presenting and performing
  3. Develop skills in interpretation, analysis and evaluation
  4. Develop sensitivity to the formal and aesthetic qualities of texts and an appreciation of how they contribute     to diverse responses and open up multiple meanings
  5. Develop an understanding of relationships between texts and a variety of perspectives, cultural contexts, and local and global issues and an appreciation of how they contribute to diverse responses and open up multiple meanings
  6. Develop an understanding of the relationships between studies in language and literature and other disciplines
  7. Communicate and collaborate in a confident and creative way
  8. Foster a lifelong interest in and enjoyment of language and literature.
Course Content 
 
Areas of Exploration: There are threeAreas of Exploration in the course to develop different skills. Each area has related texts and assessment tasks, which are outlined in more detail below.
 
Readers, writers and texts
aims to introduce students to the notion and purpose of literature, close reading and analysis, and the ways in which texts can be read, interpreted and responded to.
Time and Space
draws attention to the fact that texts are not isolated entities, but are connected to space and time (ie the texts’ various contexts of production).
Intertextuality: connecting texts
focuses on the connections between and among diverse texts, traditions, creators and ideas. This involves the comparative study of literary texts to make connections and gain a deeper understanding of the texts.
 
Concepts: Concepts are vital in studies in language and literature courses since they help to guide the study of texts across the three areas of exploration. The concepts create a sense of continuity in the transition from one area to the next and also facilitate the process of establishing connections between texts. There are seven concepts which structure the teaching and learning of Language A courses, which have been selected because of the central position they occupy in the study of both language and literature. They foreground aspects of linguistic and literary study that have been the focus of attention and inquiry. You may recognize some of them from your time in the MYP. 
 
The concepts are:
 
Identity, Culture, Creativity, Communication, Perspective, Transformation, Representation.
 
 
Course Content - YEAR 1:
Area(s) of Exploration
Concepts
Texts
Assessment
Readers, Writers, and Texts
 
Intertextuality
Identity
Culture
Representation
Langston Hughes - Selected Poems
A selection of non-literary texts and works 
Mock Individual Oral
Paper 1-type In-class assessment and semester exam
The Learner Portfolio
Readers, Writers, and Texts
 
Time and Space
Culture
Creativity
Perspective
Representation
Marjane Satrapi - Persepolis
A selection of non-literary texts and works 
Intertextuality
 
Readers, Writers, and Texts
Perspective
Communication
Sophocles - Antigone
A selection of non-literary texts and works 
Individual Oral
Paper 1-type In-class assessment and semester exam
The Learner Portfolio
 
 
YEAR 2:
Area(s) of Exploration
Concepts
Texts
Assessment
Intertextuality
 
Time and Space
Culture Transformation
Henrik Ibsen - A Doll’s House
A selection of non-literary texts and works
Paper 1-type In-class assessment and semester exam
The Learner Portfolio
Time and Space
 
Readers, Writers, Texts
Culture
Perspective
Representation
Chinua Achebe - Things Fall Apart
A selection of non-literary texts and works
Paper 1 & 2-type In-class assessment,  semester exams, and mock exams
HL Essay
The Learner Portfolio
Time and Space
 
Intertextuality
Culture
Identity
Creativity
Arundhati Roy - The God of Small Things
A selection of non-literary texts and works
 
 
Assessment Overview
External Assessment : SL: 70% /  HL: 80%
 
Paper 1 Guided Textual Analysis (exam): Two unseen texts, each accompanied by a (non-compulsory) question that suggests a stylistic point of entry into each text and indicates towards a focused reading (rather than a commentary on all aspects of the text).    
          
SL: analyse one text. Two non-literary texts will be provided; texts will be of different text types.    (1h 15min)
HL: analyse each text separately. Two texts provided; no text types will be excluded                     (2h 15min)
 
SL & HL: 35%
 
Paper 2 Comparative Essay (exam): This will require candidates to write a literary essay in which they compare and contrast two works studied in response to one of four questions of a general nature. Candidates can use works by authors on the prescribed reading list or freely chosen, studied in translation or original language, from any combination of literary forms. No works used for paper 2 can have been used in the preparation for any other component (HL essay or IA).                                                               (1h 45min) 
 
SL: 35%
HL: 25%                                                                                               

Higher Level Essay: 1200-1500 word formal essay, following a line of inquiry of the student’s choice into one of the texts studied. Students are recommended to use the seven central concepts as a starting point for developing a line of inquiry: Culture, Creativity, Communication, Perspective, Representation, Identity, Transformation.
 
HL only: 20%                                                                                   
 
Internal Assessment SL: 30% / HL: 20% 
Individual Oral: 15 minute individual oral exploring two texts in relation to a global issue of the student’s choice. First 10 minutes: student’s analysis. Remaining 5 minutes: teacher questions to encourage further development, exploration or discussion.
 
Students will use the learner portfolio to explore the relationship between the texts studied and a larger global concern of their choice. Students selects two texts to formulate their response: an extract from a literary text studied in class and a non-literary text to anchor their analysis and to act as a springboard for wider exploration of the overall text, including how meaning is constructed in the text, in connection with the chosen global issue.
Prompt: 
Examine the ways in which the global issue of your choice is presented through 
the content and form of the two texts that you have studied.        
 
Additional Course Requirement
 
The Learner Portfolio: An area to record the development of performative literacy – the literate practices that allow students to understand the meaning and implications, respond critically and make extensions beyond texts. Specifically, this will be crucial to helping students prepare for all of the assessment tasks. This component is not formally assessed by the IB, but it is required and will include feedback & ISB-graded tasks. 
 
Assessment Objectives
For each assessment component/task outlined above, there are four assessment objectives at SL and HL. You will receive rubrics and details with each task. The criteria are: 
Criterion A: (Knowledge - for Paper 2 and IA), Understanding, and interpretation
Criterion B: Analysis and evaluation
Criterion C: Focus and organization
Criterion D: Language

ISB Grading Policy
 
Your grade is based on the IB scale of 1 to 7 (3/7 at SL and 4/7 at HL are passing grades). All in-class assessments, tests and semester exams will be taken into consideration in calculating your final quarter/semester grades. Please see the percentage indicated below. 
 
Year 1 DP and non DP – Final Semester 1 and 2 grades:
40% - Quarter 1
40% - Quarter 2
20% - semester exam
 
Year 2 DP and non DP:  Semester 1 grades:                                 
40% - Quarter 1
40% - Quarter 2
20% - semester exam
 
Year 2 DP - Semester 2 grades:                                              
20% - Mock Exam (March/April)                                                 
80% - Quarter 3                                                                        
 
Year 2 non DP ISB – Semester 2 grades
80% Quarter 3
20% semester exam (May)
 
Classroom Details and Expectations
 
Class Assignments / Tests / Semester Exams
 
  • Over the course of the next two years, you will be given the opportunity to practice the necessary skills to do well on the final assessments/exams for this course. Your assignments will include:
    • Participation in class discussions and activities
    • Written responses to various texts (critical essays and creative tasks)
    • Tests and quizzes
    • Formal and informal presentations 
    • All work will be assessed using the published IBDP criterion/criteriathat best matches the assignment. 
    • You will receive quarterly/semester grades based on your completion of these assignments/tests and semester exams
Late assignments will be dealt with according to the ISB assessment policy. If you need an extension, you must discuss this with your teacher prior to the due date. If the extension is granted, you will have up to 5 school days to complete the assessment. At this time, whatever is completed will be graded; missing work will be given a zero in the ISB grade book. If you have not received an extension, 10% will be deducted from the grade of the task for each day that it is late. 
If you miss an in-class assessment or exam, you are required to submit a doctor’s note to the teacher and the IB Coordinator; failure to provide a valid doctor’s note will result in a grade of 0 for the task.   
 
Please note that completing assignments in a timely manner ensures that you are practicing the skills and receiving the feedback you need to do well on your final assessments and exams.  Time managementand responsibilityare critical to your success in this course.  
 
If you are absentyou need to make sure you find out what you have missed (email your teacher, review the assignment sheet, and/or check with a reliable classmate). DO NOT WAIT until the next time we meet to figure out what you are missing. Missing work due to absences must be made up in a timely mannerso that you do not fall behind.
  
Come prepared to class:  Be on time with the related materials, ready to participate and learn.
  • Take your studies seriouslyand treat all homework assignments as an opportunity to learn. Engage in class discussions and activities in a positive and meaningful way. 
  • Beproactiveabout your learning: Approach your teacher for additional help outside of class – we will be happy to meet with you individually to help you succeed in this course. 
Academic honesty
 
Have in mind that plagiarism will lead to serious consequences, including the possibility of being unable to participate in the IB Diploma Program. Work sent to the IB that is not properly cited or plagiarized in any part with work or ideas that are not your own will result in a 0 and failure in the IB Diploma Program. 
 
Distinguish between correct paraphrasing, direct quotation, and citation formats. Please consult the proper citation and note-taking resources on our class website or ask if you are unsure about how and when to cite. ALL formal assessment tasks MUST include citations and a Works Cited page.
 
For more information, please see the ISB Assessment and Academic honesty policy document.
 
Contact us at any time! Our emails are on the first page, and our class websitescan be found at: 
 
Ms. Z = http://mszenglishclasses.weebly.com
Ms. S-M = https://mssmenglishisb.weebly.com